Online Safety Community

Whether it’s from concern for the environment, their health or both, consumers are choosing organic foods and foods made without using genetically modified organisms (GMOs). 

The surge in popularity of these two categories has helped organic foods become one of the fastest-growing segments of food production in the United States. For anyone who has an awareness in what goes into the food they eat, walking up and down the aisles of the grocery store today reveals an increasing number of options, especially compared to current decades.

Not only do foods carry the recognized nutritional facts labels mandated by the FDA, but they also bear the symbols of organizations that certify organic food products as well as non-GMO food products. Even if these foods are distinctively labeled, there still may be some mix-up about what those labels mean. Some people may be trying to eat an organic or all-natural diet, while others may be concerned only about supporting companies that don’t use GMOs. This, along with the fact that there is some overlay between organic and non-GMO foods, can lead to misunderstanding.

Although there is some cohesion between the two groups, organic and non-GMO labels have specific meanings. For example, foods with the USDA Organic label have been made without the use of GMOs, as well as other standards certifying that the food has been produced with at least 95% organic ingredients. Foods labeled as Non-GMO, however, only need to meet the standards of containing less than 1% of GMO content. Foods certified as Non-GMO, for example, may have been exposed to chemical pesticides or fertilizers, animals may have been exposed to hormones or antibiotics, and livestock may not have been raised on 100% organic feed.

Overall, all USDA Organic certified foods are non-GMO, but not all Non-GMO certified foods are organic. 

Making sense of the differences between USDA Organic certification and Non-GMO certification is very significant to anyone who pays close attention to what he or she is putting in the grocery cart. The following infographic by PacMoore helps to mark these types of certification, and could come in handy next time you’re in the grocery store.

Views: 51

Comments are closed for this blog post

Take our poll!

Take our poll!


Understanding Data Parallelism in MapReduce

In order to understand the goals of MapReduce, it is important to realize for which scenarios MapReduce is optimized. The MapReduce programming model is created for processing data which requires…Continue

Tags: program, Implementation, Mapreduce

Started by gracylayla on Wednesday.

Automation Anywhere. How do I pick a value from dropdown

Automation Anywhere. How do I pick a value from dropdown. I tried 'set text' from a copied variable. Its very slow, and also doesnt…Continue

Tags: anywhere, automation

Started by emmablisa Mar 9.

TensorFlow serving vs TensorFlow service

I have a question regarding the difference between TensorFlow Serving versus TensorFlow service. (Sorry that I'm not familiar with this at all.)I found TensorFlow serving's definition, which is "…Continue

Tags: training, online, tensorflow

Started by emmablisa Feb 27.

Proper maintenance for Hi Vis clothing

Can you tell me how to properly take care of Hi Vis jackets? I recently purchased a few ones from this…Continue

Started by Lily Osborn Feb 25.

Forklift Operator Requirements 1 Reply

At our company we have a lot of forklift traffic that has to share the same aisles as our pedestrians. We limit the speed of our lifts to 3 mph.  I am wanting to find out what requirements for…Continue

Started by Rick Briggs. Last reply by Tony Ferraro Feb 25.



© 2018   Created by Safety Community.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service