Online Safety Community

Teaching your children how to cook is an invaluable piece of knowledge to impart. These skills will stay with them and be used and reused throughout their life. As a result, it’s important to make sure your child knows how to be safe when cooking food in order to minimise the risk of injury with cooking utensils, burns and, of course, food poisoning.

Young children are, for lack of a better word, sponges; meaning they soak up new information very quickly, providing that information is given to them in a way they understand and keeps their attention. The best way to achieve this is to involve your child with the process as often as you can and make it a fun experience for them. Some of the following suggestions might come across as simple common sense, but often when things become second nature they can be overlooked. So, what are the main things to teach your child when it comes to kitchen safety?

  • Getting Ready to Cook: Basic hygiene before cooking is very important. Make it a game for your child. Have a colourful list and see how many sessions it takes them to remember it. Things to include might be: shoes on (no bare feet as this is a risk if hot substances are spilled), tie hair up (if applicable), wash hands in soapy water, check and lay out ingredients, utensils and method for recipe.

  • Germs spreading: This is something that you might need to constantly remind your child about but there are basic and simple enough rules that they should be able to pick up over time; don’t keep cooked and uncooked foods together, wash utensils after using, keep your chopping boards separate (often sold as sets with different colours to make this easier for consumers, so you could try another little game e.g. we need to chop some vegetables, so which colour chopping board do we need?)

  • The ‘Nevers’: As a rule there are things that you shouldn’t do to keep the kitchen a safe environment. For instance, you should never: lick the inside of a mixture when cooking, pick up something from the oven without a mitt, keep handles from pots overlapping the work surface edge (to lower the risk of them being knocked off), run with knives.


Positive reinforcement: Throughout the process of teaching your child to cook you need to keep them interested, motivated and happy. Using positive reinforcement is a good way of doing this. Simply put, keep the kitchen a happy environment and this will lead to a positive experience in your child and will make them look forward to cooking with you as opposed to seeing it as a chore.

Views: 13

Comment

You need to be a member of Online Safety Community to add comments!

Join Online Safety Community

Take our poll!

Take our poll!

Latest Activity

Nakul Pratap shared their blog post on Twitter
4 hours ago
HrishikeshRam posted blog posts
9 hours ago
Kyle C. Johnson posted a discussion

[General Industry] What is your workplace's policy on headphones? Working on one currently.

I have been tasked to create a headphones (and cell phone) policy for my employer. I am relatively new to this company, but so far they've let everyone listen to headphones and mess around with their phones at any time, anywhere. Even the PIT drivers. It's insane. My initial reaction is to say NO HEADPHONES WHATSOEVER, but my ops manager is concerned it will drastically reduce morale. I suggested that each department should have their own radio and they can play music for everyone to hear, at a…See More
20 hours ago
John Robinson posted a blog post

Nutrition Facts labels of pure maple syrup and honey

FDA Commissioner, Scott Gottlieb, has announced a major overhaul of the FDA’s update to the Nutrition Facts label on products. This overhaul, the first in nearly twenty years, is aimed at empowering consumers by furnishing information on Nutrition Facts labels pure maple syrup and honey that ensures greater accuracy and is more science-based. With this, the FDA wants to help consumers make more informed and healthier choices.This update to the Nutrition Facts label has incorporated the latest…See More
yesterday

Forum

[General Industry] What is your workplace's policy on headphones? Working on one currently.

I have been tasked to create a headphones (and cell phone) policy for my employer. I am relatively new to this company, but so far they've let everyone listen to headphones and mess around with their…Continue

Tags: general, industry, distraction, music, phone

Started by Kyle C. Johnson 20 hours ago.

AI Machine Learning In Businesses How wоuld уоu define a small buѕinеѕѕ, thе number оf реrѕоnеl, thе size оf the budget, оr ѕаlеѕ?

How wоuld уоu define a small buѕinеѕѕ, thе number оf реrѕоnеl, thе size оf the budget, оr ѕаlеѕ?However you define уоur оwn ѕmаll business, it tоо can tаkе advantage оf thе AI/ …Continue

Tags: elite, crest, technologies, intelligence, Artificial

Started by emmablisa on Monday.

Distracted Driving 1 Reply

****WARNING**** Despite the fact that this is a life event portrayed by actors, it's graphic. This video should be part of…Continue

Tags: texting, fatality, safety, car, driving

Started by Wendy. Last reply by Jen McDade Dec 5.

Safety update: OSHA announces fit-test procedures 1 Reply

Fabricators as well as other workers may be required to use respirators to protect themselves from inhaling fumes, particles, or dust when performing cutting, grinding, welding, coating, or painting,…Continue

Tags: online, training, Safety, workplace, PPE

Started by Safety Training International. Last reply by Jen McDade Dec 4.

Badge

Loading…

© 2018   Created by Safety Community.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service