Online Safety Community

Information

Construction

For those working in Carpentry, Drywall, Electric, General Labor, HVAC, Landscaping, Masonry and Plumbing.

Website: http://www.ansellconstruction.com
Members: 267
Latest Activity: May 3

Links

Learn more about the Ansell Construction Glove Series
Switch to reliable hand protection with Ansell Better Than Leather
Visit the Specialty Tools & Fasteners Distributors Association website

Discussion Forum

Construction Safety Videos 3 Replies

Free downloadable construction safety videos to use in your safety meeting or crew talks:http://tinyurl.com/4z4rdt…Continue

Tags: construction, resources, videos

Started by WorkSafeBC.com. Last reply by Mymic May 3.

OSHA Inspection At Santa’s Workshop 1 Reply

Even Santa isn't safe from OSHA! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4SIdBALvDwJay…Continue

Started by Jay D. Rohman. Last reply by Donald R. Schwenke Dec 30, 2015.

Safety Week!

May 4 - 10, 2014 is the first ever Construction Safety Week!  31 companies joined together to create a special focus on safety.  Is anyone doing anything to celebrate, or observe it?Continue

Tags: week, safety

Started by Brittany Long May 5, 2014.

Tying off to Adjacent Poles 3 Replies

I am aware that scissor lifts do not fall under the aerial lift standards (although they should) but rather under the mobile scaffold standards. However, is there any standard someone can find about…Continue

Started by Garry L Mullins Jr. Last reply by Terry P. Keenan Oct 4, 2013.

New ASME B30.5 and OSHA C-DAC 4 Replies

Can anybody please give me a straight up answer on an exact date the new 2007 ASME B30.5 regulations take effect. Also when osha's C-DAC goes in effect. Every crane site and magazine i read praises…Continue

Tags: operator, rigger, asme, osha, construction

Started by Jason Nash. Last reply by Kevin Moore May 20, 2013.

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Construction to add comments!

Comment by hizairy on May 19, 2010 at 5:39am
hello everybody! i have several question here and hoping anyone could give me an answer for my study assignment. so here the question
1-List out 10 activity mostly operate at construction site?
2-Identify 10 types of hazard occurred at construction site?
3-Strategy should taken by the employer to manage and decrease risk of safety and health at workplace?
4-List out 3 regulation that relate to fire safety?
5-List out 5 example of confine space workplace?
6-Proper planning should be done before, current and after implementing task in confine space. Describe 3 stage of safety planning in confine space work process
7-Describe about flammability limit and draw flammability limit diagram

im hoping anyone could give me the answer as soon as posibble or directly email to me at hizairy@gmail.com .thank you
Comment by Kevin Larsen on May 5, 2010 at 3:10am
Terry is right and wrong. tie off point is key in my eyes. most studies are a 340lb worker with a fall distance of six feet to reach the 12 or 14 foot arrest distance. you would have to tie off about two feet below your feet to reach that distance. even at waist level its about three feet and is your momentem going to be fast enough to strech the lanyard all 31/2 feet i dont know. why dont we start training our selves and our hands in the field instead of listening to the scare tactictics from whomever is scareing us to compliance.
Comment by Terence (Terry) Kidd on March 7, 2010 at 2:44pm
Ron is giving good advice here guys but I have some points to add. Rather than relying on harnesses, retractables and anchor points why not install edge protection instead? Eliminate the risk of a fall rather than rely on fall protection.

In addition, I often see guys working from the bucket of an elevated work platform (in Oz you must where a harness and be hooked onto the bucket when working from EWPs) but they will be working only 12-20 feet above the ground and are wearing shock absorber lanyards on their harnesses. The problem is that the shock absorber lanyard will not stop them from hitting the ground at those heights.

One other point, when there is an arrested fall what are the rescue plans you insist on to avoid suspension trauma? We require rescue within 5 minutes and insist on a rescue plan being written into the safe work method statement for the task.
Comment by Ronald McKenzie on March 6, 2010 at 8:08pm
That depends on the area\state you are working in. California, depending on the code section, does not allow you to tie off below the waist. You should never have more than 5 foot of free fall. A retractable should not allow you to travel more than 2 feet. When you attach at your feet then you have the 4 foot distance to the level of your D ring, retractable, plus the four feet of slack in the line, (at least). then the 2-3 feet of the harness stretching because no one ever wears the harness as tight as they should. So... basically, the lanyard, harness will extend 6 feet over your head, plus however tall you are. ( 13 feet?, plus swing room)
Comment by Tom Trauger on March 6, 2010 at 7:56pm
Can you use a retractable line with anchor points at your feet on a wood structure?
What is the minimum fall distance clearance you need so you do not hit the level below if you are using a retractable line with anchor points at your feet?
Comment by Ronald McKenzie on March 6, 2010 at 7:47pm
If the entire length played out, then they had the wrong type of retractable. Some retractables are not designed for horizontal use. The ratchet mechanism should stop within 2 feet. Otherwise the acceleration will exceed the max. strength for the cable.
Comment by Daniel Wampler on March 6, 2010 at 7:16pm
Hey Heather -
Thanks for spurring on discussion! To answer your question, usually re-certification is not too expensive (like $50 - $100). Even without re-certification, though, the unit should not have snapped. Are you saying that the unit did not arrest the fall - that it just kept "playing out" for the entire 30'? Often, the failures that are seen with retractable lifelines have to do with using the wrong type of retractable for the application. For instance, if the lifeline itself will need to go over a leading edge (be exposed to the edge itself) during a fall, it needs to be a steel cable or Kevlar material that is certified for that type of use. Most retractables are not. When exposed to the extra trauma of the leading edge - and transferring the forces of that fall against that edge - the unit may "snap" if not designed for that. I wonder if this is what happened in that case. Retractables that are made for this application also should have a secondary deceleration device mounted to the end of the lanyard attached to the worker that will absorb most of the force of the fall. Here is an example: click here.

I know that was a whole lot of info that was not the exact question that you were asking, but is a "misuse" that I run into quite a bit. I thought it was worth mentioning. Thanks!
Comment by Terence (Terry) Kidd on March 2, 2010 at 2:50pm
Cheers !!! Our pleasure.
Comment by Ronald McKenzie on February 24, 2010 at 3:12pm
Hi Heather,
I agree with Terry, the Hierachy of controls is the guide. We do mainly Highrise construction, and Ladders are never used for access to the working deck. 60" high guardrails with netting to prevent falling material.
A cost comparison would be next to impossible. The work will go faster without PFA, but that is a difficult item to quantify since the site conditions change so much.
There is a huge learning curve to teach someone how to utilze manlifts instead of climbing the re-bar or steel structures, and then the next building is completely different.
Comment by Terence (Terry) Kidd on February 24, 2010 at 2:36pm
Hi Heather, our work at height hazard controls are determined by the hierarchy of controls, followed by what is the best solution for the specific task. Our industri is construction and as an example I'll use a roofing task. Initially we use elevated work platforms to install safety mesh all over the roof. We then use elevated work platforms plus the installed safety mesh to install guard rails as edge protection. From there we install temporary scaffold stairs for access. From then on, no further controls are necessary. Under our policies ladders are prohibited from being used as a work platform unless there is no practical alternative. Ladders are for access only. An example of 'no practical alternative' would be to use a step ladder to fit a light fitting in a small room such as a cleaners cupboard where there is no room for an alternative means of access.

Cheers,
 

Members (267)

 
 
 

Take our poll!

Take our poll!

Latest Activity

Roger Steven posted a blog post

MentorHealth Webinar Calendar of Upcoming Courses

MentorHealth webinars are designed to offer professionals in the healthcare industry the knowledge they need in all the areas of the healthcare industry that enables them to excel in their professions. MentorHealth’s trainings bring experts from all the core areas of healthcare and impart learning to help professionals understand and implement all the important issues that matter to their professions. To keep updating your knowledge of regulatory compliance in the healthcare industry, all that…See More
13 hours ago
Profile IconShannon Case, Billy, Jane Otterson and 4 more joined Online Safety Community
13 hours ago
kate smith posted a blog post

The importance of onboarding

The importance of onboarding can be understood from the fact that it starts with the induction of the new hires and acclimatizes them with all the important aspects of the new organization, such as the culture, environment, people, and the business. In the light of the important elements that go into onboarding; it is a fallacy and a misconception to assume that it is yet another ritual that HR has to perform with new employees, hand them a cup of coffee and carry out the paperwork.Onboarding…See More
15 hours ago
Adam Fleaming posted an event
Thumbnail

Webinar Calendar of Upcoming Courses June 2017 at Online

June 2, 2017 at 10am to June 15, 2017 at 11:30am
Compliance4All webinars are just what professionals in the regulatory compliance areas need for scaling up in their careers. With a collection of the most erudite experts on regulatory compliance being available at a click in the comfort of your preferred location; regulatory compliance could not get any simpler and effective! Compliance4All’s experts help you unravel all the knowledge you need in all the areas of regulatory compliance. They help professionals like you implement the regulations…See More
15 hours ago

Discussion Forum

Construction Safety Videos 3 Replies

Free downloadable construction safety videos to use in your safety meeting or crew talks:http://tinyurl.com/4z4rdt…Continue

Tags: construction, resources, videos

Started by WorkSafeBC.com. Last reply by Mymic May 3.

OSHA Inspection At Santa’s Workshop 1 Reply

Even Santa isn't safe from OSHA! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4SIdBALvDwJay…Continue

Started by Jay D. Rohman. Last reply by Donald R. Schwenke Dec 30, 2015.

Safety Week!

May 4 - 10, 2014 is the first ever Construction Safety Week!  31 companies joined together to create a special focus on safety.  Is anyone doing anything to celebrate, or observe it?Continue

Tags: week, safety

Started by Brittany Long May 5, 2014.

Tying off to Adjacent Poles 3 Replies

I am aware that scissor lifts do not fall under the aerial lift standards (although they should) but rather under the mobile scaffold standards. However, is there any standard someone can find about…Continue

Started by Garry L Mullins Jr. Last reply by Terry P. Keenan Oct 4, 2013.

New ASME B30.5 and OSHA C-DAC 4 Replies

Can anybody please give me a straight up answer on an exact date the new 2007 ASME B30.5 regulations take effect. Also when osha's C-DAC goes in effect. Every crane site and magazine i read praises…Continue

Tags: operator, rigger, asme, osha, construction

Started by Jason Nash. Last reply by Kevin Moore May 20, 2013.

Badge

Loading…

© 2017   Created by Safety Community.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service